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Dear Granny and Eloise

Dear Granny and Eloise,

What are some good study-abroad programs?

Sincerely,

Wanderlust Waldo

Dear Wanderlust Waldo,

Ah, dearie, to have the opportunity to travel is an excellent one. It’s great that you’re looking into it, but where you should go depends on your language skills and your interests. Drexel offers many great study-abroad programs, but if you don’t find anything that suits your interests and abilities, there are outside resources, too. You can just use your Internet thingy and search it, but be wary of scams. Good luck!

Toodles,

Granny

Dear Wanderlust Waldo,

Studying abroad is a great way to get new experiences, especially if you are physically fit enough to re-enact the movie “Taken.” If you’re not physically fit enough, you should befriend someone who resembles Liam Neeson to make it more realistic. Obviously a great study abroad program would be one in Paris. I’m a tad bit biased because I’m clearly a huge Francophone — hello, my name is Eloise — but it’s all right. Just imagine sitting in cafes like Ernest Hemingway or F. Scott Fitzgerald. If you don’t have the language experience, you can just attempt to fake it by saying everything with a French accent while wearing stripes. If you’re not a huge Francophile because you had a disappointing childhood or hate the way France lost all of their wars, you can check out Drexel’s study-abroad website for more countries to visit.

Sincerely,

Eloise

Dear Granny and Eloise,

This term has been really busy, and I haven’t been able to see many people. I feel as if I’m growing apart from my really close friend. How do I solve this issue? I obviously really care about her.

Sincerely,

Loner Lisa

Dear Loner Lisa,

With time, even some of the closest friends drift apart. If you are concerned that this is happening to you and want to preserve the friendship, then reach out to the person. I don’t mean just saying “hi” as you pass her by on bingo night. Instead, go seek her out when she has free time and have a serious discussion with her. Try to find the source of the problem if there is one. Consider both her issues and your own because friendship is a two-way street; no one person is at fault for the distance. If it means something to you (and it clearly does given that you’re writing about it), then reach out to her or deal with it.

Toodles,

Granny

Dear Loner Lisa,

You should get out a handy dandy ruler and measure the distance between you two. Keep her within 65 inches at all times. This way you can practice for the three-legged race, bond over grilled cheese at the dining hall and pass as conjoined twins to nearby strangers. If this seems a little too close for comfort, you can also sign a pact to be allies in case water fights or paintball battles break out between other Drexel students — just make sure you actually stick to them, unlike Stalin and Hitler. If you don’t see any wars breaking out any time soon, you can also just force her to watch Netflix movies with you in your pajamas or play Clue. Solving crimes always forces people to bond — just look at Sherlock Holmes and Watson.

Sincerely,

Eloise